Looking for work in 2019? Things may be different than the last time you searched.

Last month we released our definitive guide to the science of the job search, which offered a comprehensive analysis about the job search landscape in 2018. With a wealth of information and data to help you put your best foot forward in terms of your job search, we also recognize that no two years (or job searches) are alike which brings us to…

Surprise! This year is different

There are tons of variables when searching for a new job — individual requirements, experience level, age, application processes, the list goes on. What may have been a straightforward process in the past is now full of nuances and surprises. What’s more is the increasing feeling that searching for a job is a part-time job in and of itself. While we like to think our research gives us a good idea of what to expect, we wanted to talk to the people who are going through the process right now to find out, more specifically, what’s different this time around. What makes 2019 different?

This time last year I was overconfident and a bit egotistical about my job search. I took a semi-passive approach – assuming they would contact me. However after a few months I realized my resume needed work, my cover letter (if I even had one) needed updating, and I needed to keep my resume updated as often as I update my Facebook status…

— Patrick D., Sales Manager

To put it simply: Even if you’ve done this before, don’t expect the search to be the same.

More jobs are available

Despite some challenges in the market, the fact is there’s a pretty significant increase in jobs available now than in previous years — over 200% in certain industries. The folks we surveyed reported wide-ranging observations of the increase of job availability specific to their situation — with job seekers increasing their experience and different fields growing, there are an influx of jobs available; there are even more options for both employees and employers, making for a difficult decision making process.

Survey says…

We talked to folks in all different stages of their careers, from recent college graduates to seasoned professionals. It’s only a few weeks into the New Year, but some common themes emerged. To start, 60% of people starting the job search in 2019 are still employed. We know from experience that people who showed they were currently employed (even if creatively) saw a +149% hireability boost.

More does not necessarily equate to an easier search —

“There are more jobs available, but the market is more competitive in the new city I’ve relocated to.”

— Travis S., Content Creator

60% also expect their current search to take longer than previous search. Why do people expect this search to take longer than previous ones? Well, for starters, 23% of that 60% have already been at it for a long time. In some cases, responders reported having been in full-fledged job search mode for 7-8 months. One user even stated they have been at it since November 2017.

We know people are looking, but what exactly do they want?

A whopping 70% are looking because they want a higher salary.

“In the last 10 years, total compensation for 90th percentile income earners went up by 26% compared to a 21% increase for 10th percentile income earners — but the real gap was in benefits, where the value of benefits for 90th percentile earners went up 37% compared to a mere 15% increase for 10th percentile earners.”

— The 2019 Job Search Landscape

It’s not surprising a higher salary is at the forefront of many job searches. As experience is gained, worth increases. Not to mention the cost of living is skyrocketing across the United States. The statistic above may not sound promising, but there are some things we can recommend.

What should job seekers expect?

The general blueprint of a job search is more or less predictable — from polishing your resumé and crafting the perfect cover letter, to filling out as many applications as you can (which we aim to streamline to save you time for the other surprises), to preparing for an interview and waiting, for what seems like an eternity, for a callback…

That doesn’t mean the 2019 search will be the same as years prior, though. over 90 % of our survey respondents said the job search feels inexplicably different this time around. But why?

Search criteria has changed

Gone are the days of staying in the same career from graduation to retirement. The minimum amount of time necessary to “build” one’s resume at a particular job are decreasing. Interests, requirements, and general life circumstances all contribute to the changing climate of the search.

“I will finish my Bachelor’s in a few months and am looking for a career in my chosen field rather than part-time work I have looked for in the past.”

— PJ D., Software Engineer

Entry-level jobs require more experience

How in the world are you supposed to build your resumé if your first career in the job force requires 3+ years of experience? We tackled this subject last Spring, but the experience paradox is still weighing on people’s minds. “[It seems] more and more entry-level positions are requiring professional experience in my field.” One TalentWorks user indicated the perils of not being able to start their search in a new career field because they were not qualified to even begin the application process until they completed the necessary certifications.

What can you do about this?

  • Apply for Jobs Within ±2 Years of Your Experience — You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. From what we see, if you’re within ±2 years of required experience, hiring managers will often consider you “close enough.”
  • Use Freelance Jobs To Build Your Experience —Not only will you get paid, you’ll also have far higher chances getting your second job (everyone else’s first job).

Full details: 61% of “Entry-Level” Jobs Require 3+ Years of Experience

The application process is different, and so are employer expectations

Respondents reported companies wanting more for less (in addition to experience), such as more skills for less pay. That’s clearly not ideal — you deserve what you’re worth! Moreover, the application process can feel like one giant black-hole. Everything is automated and there’s no opportunity for personal touch, which can feel pretty discouraging.

With an influx of recruiters, the same positions are being submitted over and over again. The result? Companies are overwhelmed with the same applicants being submitted by different recruiters and agencies.

Want to cheat the system? Our AI-driven system saves you time, energy, and ensures you’re getting out a record number of applications. We even optimize the time and day of your application so it doesn’t fall into the blackhole.

Changing expectations

We know, it’s easier said than done. While we have a wealth of data available about the specifics of the job search, there’s a very human element that cannot be distilled in a set of numbers.

As people move through their career, pursue further education, explore the world of entrepreneurship, and experience the unpredictability of life in general, expectations for a new job can change, and may need to change due to life circumstances.

“For better or for worse, I’m focused on a few narrow, but related fields, rather than general fields.”

— Tracy B., Operations Leader

“I don’t know where I fit. I have loads of specialist skills. I’ve had similar jobs to what I’m looking for, but interviews demand much more and things change so quickly in my field…” 

— Amanda L., Digital Content

Expectations from employers are moving targets that can take anyone by surprise, but don’t let the fluidity knock you out of your element. Be humble; remain confident.

Take the surprise in stride

Even when you think you might know, you might not really know…surprises in the job search don’t have to mean completely recalibrating everything you once felt comfortable with in the search. It does mean, though, utilizing different tools to help you be successful, and staying positive — no matter what variables are present in the current job search climate.

Not prepared to go at it alone? We’ve got your back. Let us take care of the most consuming parts of the job search for you.

Outside sources:

Dear Sarah – I’m a furloughed worker. What’s the quickest, most effective way to update my resume?

Hi Sarah,

As you probably know, US federal workers are currently working without pay. Unfortunately, being a federal worker myself, my family can’t sustain this for much longer (especially because I’m contract). I need another job right now. What’s the quickest way to update my resume?

Thank you,

Pay me Now

Hi PmN,

The current situation regarding federal employees is terrible and “moonlighting” to supplement your income isn’t a solution, as has been suggested. So, let’s get to it. Here’s the quick and dirty for improving/updating your resume in 20 minutes:

Add Numbers

Using concrete numbers provides you with a hireabilty increase of 40.2%! We recommend for every 3 sentences, use at least 1 number to demonstrate your (concrete) impact. 

concrete-numbers-resume-tip.png

Put yourself in the shoes of a hiring manager. Who would you rather hire:

Helped increase sales by 31% by working with Operations Manager to reduce time to 1st customer reply.

Collaborated with Operations Manager improve customer reply times.

Cut the Fat

Every word on your resume should have purpose. Clean-up your resume and retain precious resume real estate by taking out the following:

  • Objectives 
  • “Resume/CV” at the top of the page or “References provided upon request” at the bottom
  • Your photograph
  • Any usage of “I” or “My”. (Write in the 3rd person.)
  • Generic list of skills
  • Irrelevant job experience(s)
  • “Weird” interests/hobbies

Know when to apply

Apply on Mondays (don’t apply on Fridays or Saturdays).

Apply before 10am.

what-best-time-apply-for-job

Meeting ~50% of job “requirements” is good enough. Don’t hesitate!

Additionally, apply to 150-250 jobs. Despite the low unemployment rate, the job market is extremely competitive. Everyone, regardless of credentials and work history, can expect to send out hundreds of resumes…so, start auditing your resume right now.

As an added bonus, we’d like to offer all furloughed federal workers a free membership and would encourage you to connect with us ASAP. Please send an email to hello@talent.works and our team will help you find a job 5.8x faster.

Best,

ask-sarah.png

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The 2019 Job Search Landscape

The beginning of the year is a great time to step up your job search game, but searching for a job now takes more time than ever. On average, job-seekers now spend 3 hours and 16 minutes searching for jobs each day —  44% longer than during the 2008 recession.

job_search_hours_spent_annotated.png

Searching for a job is now a part-time job in and of itself. Over the last decade, there’s been a huge increase in the amount of online resources for the job search, so any job seeker looking to conduct a comprehensive search needs to dedicate some serious time. People are getting choosier about their jobs too, so there’s extra time involved to ensure you’re finding the right job. And employers are inundated with applications so you have to apply to more jobs than ever to make sure you’re one of the lucky few who land an interview.

Don’t have that kind of time? We can help.

Not only that, but we crunched the numbers from a variety of sources and found that:

  • Job satisfaction is down — on average, people stay at jobs for 1 year now rather than 2 years.
  • If you’re at the top of your field, employers are willing to do more than ever to try to keep you happy.
  • There are some easy things you can do to give yourself an edge.

Job satisfaction is down

Not happy at your current job? You’re not alone. 71% of currently employed people in the US are thinking about looking for a new job or actively looking already. And we’ve found in data from our users that people are leaving jobs sooner, likely an indication of lower job satisfaction.

job_tenure_trend_annotated.png

The average job tenure has gone down from 2 years to just 1 year. No longer do you have to feel guilty about cutting and running 12 months in — this is the norm now, and companies aren’t likely to hold it against you.

Employers are trying harder than ever to keep top talent

The class divide continues to grow. Compensation is up, but improvements on this front have disproportionately impacted the top income-earners.

compensation

In the last 10 years, total compensation for 90th percentile income earners went up by 26% compared to a 21% increase for 10th percentile income earners — but the real gap was in benefits, where the value of benefits for 90th percentile earners went up 37% compared to a mere 15% increase for 10th percentile earners.

Employers are trying their best to attract and retain the best talent, and that doesn’t just mean paying them more, it also means providing them with great benefits.

How can you make sure you get as much as possible from your next job?

You can give yourself an edge

Want to get yourself out of your current ho-hum job into your dream job? Based on our analysis throughout 2018, here are some key things you can do to maximize your chances of getting an interview.

Looking for more ways to give yourself an edge? Check out our definitive guide, summarizing all the analysis we did in 2018 (35 data-backed tips!) on how to improve your chances at getting an interview.

Methodology

In-house Analysis

To determine the change in average job duration, we randomly sampled 55,587 employments across 15,041 users from TalentWorks. Then we grouped those by the month each job ended and computed the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile job durations for each month. All analysis and graphing was done using python with pandas, sklearn, scipy, and bokeh.

Outside Sources

Why Are We Doing This?

With ApplicationAssistant right now, we can boost the average job-seeker’s hireability by ~5.8x. But, what makes ApplicationAssistant work has been an internal company secret until now. We’re fundamentally a mission-driven company and we believe we can help more people by sharing our learnings. So, that’s exactly what we’re doing.

Creative Commons

We’re not only sharing this but also sharing all of it under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. In other words, as long as you follow a few license terms, this means you can:

  • Share: Copy, redistribute the material in any medium or format.
  • Adapt: Remix, transform, and build upon the material.