Dear Sarah,

I’m currently in the job market and have been applying to dozens of different positions a day. It just occurred to me that I might be shooting myself in the foot with just the one resume as I’m not getting any responses. Could this be why I’m still unemployed?

Thanks,

Debating Multiples

Hey DM,

Not knowing your situation fully I can’t attribute this as being The Reason why you’re still looking, but I would say your intuition is correct and here’s why:

Hiring managers are adept at spotting generic resumes. Trust me. It’s actually a big reason why you may be dismissed as a candidate. From the title of your attachment (i.e.: ‘JohnDoe_Marketing’) to the cadence of your cover letter, it’s much more effective and worth your time to tailor each resume to the desired job/position.

I know, I know. It’s easier to cast a wide net with the one resume, and sometimes that works. But, if your response rate is low or your not getting the ‘right’ responses for what you desire job-wise, please consider either adding more personalization or in some cases crafting multiple resumes.

If the jobs you’re applying to have distinctly different needs, it makes sense to have completely separate resumes. For example, if you’re a financial analyst for a non-profit but are looking to cross industries into marketing it would make sense to have two separate resumes where, for instance, you can focus on how your data driven background and brand knowledge precipitated your interest in business. Removing very specific, unadaptive skills and focusing on transferable skills is key.

Unless you’re making a drastic career change, having multiple resumes isn’t really necessary. It’s for this reason that I’d start with tailoring what you have to better suit the job.

Some quick personalization tips, I’d recommend:

  • Use keywords: You’re most likely competing with hundreds of other candidates. Hiring managers (especially in larger companies) are using quick scans and applicant tracking systems to quickly narrow down an applicant pool. Using words from the job description everywhere in your resume helps to ensure you’re still a contender.
  • Focus on the employer’s needs: Really look at the job description. If the role indicates “cross-functional collaboration” and you have the experience working in such an environment be sure to weave that into your resume. Use real examples, as well.
  •  Use numbers with your keywords: Adding numbers to your transferable achievements is extremely eye-catching. Were you responsible for “managing customer service”? Instead of using something ambiguous and vague, use it as an opportunity to tout your accomplishments: “Increased survey response rate by 15% with excellent customer service”. 

All the best!

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