“What gives me the right to be at this interview?” 
“Do I belong here?”
“Did their HR make a mistake?”

 

Is it difficult to communicate your accomplishments during interviews? Do you feel as if what is on paper doesn’t represent the “real you”?

Many people suffer from interview jitters, but for some it’s an all-consuming feeling where they believe themselves a fraud and their interview a complete fluke despite their quality as a candidate. This persistent feeling of self-doubt may also sometimes hamper a candidate’s chance of moving forward in the hiring pipeline if they are coming across as unconfident. It’s called ‘imposter syndrome’ (IP) and many people from all walks of life will experience it in their lifetime. 

In job interviews especially, the last thing you would want to do is discount your achievements and have trouble remembering all the awesome projects you managed. So, how do you beat it during the interview process?

Familiarity will calm your nerves

Do your homework. Research typical interview questions for your specific job title and of course the company itself. Glassdoor is a great resource for checking out the specific questions candidates were asked and their overall interview experience. (Of course, take it with a grain of salt as everyone’s experience differs.) Realize that it is normal to expect to learn new skills in a new job and practice how you are going to frame questions around areas you need to improve.

Your internal dialogue isn’t reality

You may think you’re tanking the interview, but understand that the hiring manager sees something different and even expects some level of nervousness. While you’re overthinking how they must be perceiving you, you’re actively forgetting that an interview is a two-way street. You are there to interview the company, meet potential coworkers and managers, check out the workspace and generally see if this would work for you. Be present, focused, and try to enjoy yourself.

Hard work>Perfection

High-achievers and perfectionists are vulnerable to imposter syndrome because they’re constantly setting unrealistic expectations for themselves. It’s important to realize that nobody knows everything, and that’s okay! Seeing yourself as a hard-worker who gets things done as opposed to someone constantly chasing perfection will help you recognize your strengths and speak to them authentically.

Take your time

When candidates are nervous they tend to talk fast and immediately respond to every question. Give yourself a moment to absorb the information and ask clarifying questions, if necessary. You might even take notes or request to use the whiteboard. Hiring managers are looking for thoughtful, calm responses and prefer you take as much time as you need to answer their questions.

Post-interview evaluation

After the interview is over, give yourself an honest self-evaluation. Write down all the positive aspects that you believe contributed to your possibly getting the job. This behavioral conditioning exercise will help steer you away from focusing on the negative unnecessarily and instead how well you managed your stress.

Conclusion

Imposter syndrome is the idea that you got to where you are professionally due to some kind of error. The causality is unclear, but there are steps to take to better help you realize your accomplishments with the confidence you deserve. Interviews may seem daunting but, as the job seeker, much of what seems intimidating is controllable.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

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