Dear Addie — Should I follow up after submitting an application?

Dear Addie,

I have been submitting 10-20 applications per week. I’m including my resumé and custom cover letters specific to each company, but I’m not hearing anything back. Not even a rejection. I feel like my applications are being sent into a deep abyss. Should I follow up when I don’t hear back? And if so, when is a good time?

Thanks,
Applying into an Abyss

Dear AiaA,

First off, great work on keeping your application volume up. 10-20 applications per week is solid. It’s a pretty clear cause and effect scenario — the more applications you send, the more likely you are to get an interview, and so on. Even if every job application you send out isn’t a perfect match, it’s still a good idea to cast a wide net in hopes of landing an interview (and eventually a job offer).

The question still remains, though — are your applications getting lost in a deep abyss? It’s possible — and that’s exactly why you shouldn’t assume no response = no interest.

Should I Follow Up?

By all means, yes! You should follow up. I know, it seems pestering to contact an employer after an application is submitted. After all, wouldn’t they have just contacted you if they were interested?

Follow-ups can be tricky — you’re treading the fine line of being proactive and pushy. The reality, though, is application volume can be so high the hiring manager is equally as overwhelmed as the job seeker.

When Should I Follow-Up?

Is there a posting deadline? — Be mindful of the close date on the application. Do not contact the employer before the application even closes. Not only would be considered generally annoying, but it would be futile.

Wait until 5-7 days after the closing date to follow-up.

No posting deadline? — The same advice applies. Following-up 5-7 days after submitting the application, regardless of when you submit, is considered appropriate.

How Should I Follow-Up?

without coming off as annoying and/or desperate

This is probably the most important element to consider. If your application was never reviewed (and even if it was, hiring manager’s spend an average of six seconds looking at an application), this is your chance to make a positive first impression.

Keep it short and sweet. Don’t ask why you haven’t been contacted yet, but rather use this time as an opportunity to express genuine interest for the position available.

Should you pick up the phone or stick with an e-mail? It depends. Many applications explicitly state NO phone calls, in which case, the answer is pretty obvious. Simply do not call them. That’s a sure fire way to keep your resumé in the dark abyss forever.

On the other hand, if the application doesn’t discourage phone calls, this can be a pretty powerful follow-up tool — especially in an age where everything is textual and phones are really just miniature computers.

The key to a successful phone call? — Don’t call more than once. Consider it powerful ammo that you only need to deploy once. Keep it friendly and concise, using it as a brief introduction and and opportunity to get a handle on the timeframe for moving forward.

Writing an e-mail is also a great approach (and the only approach that is appropriate if the hiring manager wants to avoid phone calls…save showing up at the office, but we don’t really recommend that!). Again, it’s all about keeping it short and sweet.

Here’s a template you can easily customize:

Hello [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I hope this finds you well! I am following up on the open [position title]. I submitted my application and resume, and I would like to kindly ask for the timeline on the hiring process. I am very enthusiastic at the prospect of joining your team and leveraging [your specific skills, knowledge, and experience] to help you [what profit you’d bring to the company]. Please let me know if you need any more details about my application. I look forward to speaking with you and sharing my ideas on how to help you with your upcoming challenges.

Kind regards,

[Name]

[include contact info]


It’s really that simple. The hard part, which we can all relate to at some point in the job search, is accepting the reality that the employer may just not be interested. In which case, keep doing what you’re doing! If you’re tired of going at it alone, you can access one of our experienced hiring managers to help you along the way!

Cheers,