Get A Job Fast By Automating Your Job Search

There are plenty of things about the job hunt that can catch an applicant flat-footed. Getting fired unexpectedly or suddenly being asked to navigate confusing benefits systems can rattle even the most hardened of workers. It’s disheartening and that’s before we even get to the truth of the matter: the job search requires you to be an expert in a skill you probably didn’t learn because you hoped to never use it.

While you were out specializing in your field and getting better at what you actually do to earn a living, the rules of the job search were solidifying. Now, recruiters expect you to be versed in their codes before they’ll even give you a call back.

It’s a lot to ask and it’s why we’re here. We know the search and how to cater your application to make sure that it ticks all the right boxes. We can use our troves of data and our AI to remove the hassle from your search and get you back into what you really know how to do.

Here’s just a few reasons why you should consider automating your job search.

Reduce Mistakes

Chances are, you probably don’t work in data entry. (If you do, we can help you, too!) But anyone who does knows that manually entering data only provides more opportunities for mistakes. Introducing the human element into any situation ups the odds of typos and blunders dramatically and that holds true for your application.

If we can optimize your resume and apply to the jobs you want on your behalf, we can eliminate the likelihood of prospect-killing mistakes.

Lean On Experts

We know the job search. We’ve been collecting data on the who, what, why, when and how of hiring for years, scanning millions of  want ads and figuring out what works and what doesn’t for recruiters. Unlike you, we have specialized in the field of getting people hired and we want to share our knowledge with as many people as possible.

Save Time

If you’re scrambling after losing a job (or just looking for something new outside of your already demanding schedule), time can be hard to come by. Trawling through countless job boards and reading untold amounts of postings to figure out which jobs are actually looking for someone like you is more than just a pain, it’s probably costing you money.

That’s time that could be better spent working on something you care about or taking the time to catch up with your family and friends. Let us automate your search to take the searching part out of your daily routine, only offering you the best jobs for your specific skillset.

The best part of all of this? It’s only $5-$10 a week and we guarantee that we’ll get you in the room with the people you need to talk to. Check it out and lose the hassle of self-searching.

 

Ace Your Phone Interview With These Tips

You finally did it. You managed to climb your way up out of the abyss of hundreds of resumes to land an interview with a real, live person. Well, a real live person’s voice, at least. The job you’re looking for is ready to do their first interview of you and they want to talk to you over the phone

To a generation of text-based communicators who only call when someone’s dead or in jail, this can be nerve-wracking. When was the last time you had to react immediately to what was being said? But there’s plenty of ways to work around that fear and not just get through a phone interview, but make it work for you. Here’s a few quick tips that will help you ace your next job-searching convo:

Be Ready

The job interview process is a slog on all sides. While you might feel discouraged when you don’t land the responses you want, the person on the other end has to sort through mountains of underqualified applicants just to get to the interview.

To combat fatigue and speed things along, the interview process has built up a few core questions that almost every recruiter is going to ask. An open-ended directive to “tell me about yourself” is the starting gambit of just about every chat and you can also expect to discuss strengths and weaknesses. If you need a few tips on how to handle those, we got your back.

Be Enthusiastic

The interviewer needs to leave the conversation thinking you want the job. Try and be a little chipper about the idea that they might be giving you steady work. It helps if you only apply for the jobs you want, which is definitely something our AI can do for you.

Do Enough Research To Make Your Questions Smart

You should know quite a bit about the company you are looking to join, but don’t be afraid to ask questions during the interview. Most interviewers are expecting you to have questions for them and will knock you down a few notches if you don’t ask any. Feel free to ask questions you know the answer to to flex your knowledge about the company’s practices and day-to-day operations.

Find A Quiet Place

We’re not saying that John Krasinski-style boogins will come for you if you try and hold an interview somewhere noisy. But it will irritate the interviewer if they can’t hear you over the sound of your environment.

Breathe

You don’t want to sound shaky on the phone. Relax and remind yourself that the person on the other end is just that, a person. Keep calm and steady yourself to avoid putting the interviewer off by audibly sweating.

To use these tips, however, you have to land an interview. That’s what we do best. We can optimize your resume using our wealth of experience (as well as mountains of data) and send it out for you in an automated process that we guarantee will land you a phone call. Check it out if you don’t believe us.

Resume Tips from Hiring Managers: Pros Tell How To Get Noticed

The job search internet is rife with articles telling you all the many ways that you can get ahead in the job search process. Frequently, these are written by journalists and bloggers, the occupations that most readily come to mind when someone says the phrase “jack of all trades, master of none.” While it might be true that in the land of the unemployed and desperate, the semi-knowledgeable contract worker is king, we want you to live under a somewhat more justifiable monarchy.

That’s why we went straight to the source, pulling our job search tips directly from hiring managers — the true experts in this situation — to find out what advice they would give to people who most need it.

Don’t Lie

While it might be tempting to juice your resume a bit with half-truths, too frequently these become whole lies. Sell yourself as you actually are and avoid an awkward conversation at an interview that is wasting everyone’s time. As USA Today put it, “don’t end up embarrassed or out of your depth because you stretched the truth on your resume.”

Share Your Actual Weaknesses

Nothing irks a hiring manager more than asking for a weakness and getting an eye-rolling answer like “being a perfectionist.” Ask A Manager’s Allison Green says that “candidates who won’t come up with a realistic assessment…make me think they lack insight and self-awareness.”

Use Task/Result Speech

Write actively. List your accomplishments in a way that lets the hiring manager know exactly what you did and what the outcome was. Another tip: quantifiable data is amazing. If you have numbers that can demonstrate your impact, don’t hesitate to use them.

If You’re Overqualified, Address It

Don’t be afraid to mention that a job is below what you’ve typically done. Explain to the hiring manager why you’re willing to take on this role to avoid them thinking you might get bored.

Don’t Use An Objective (Unless It Helps)

Unless you belong to a specific subset of careers (writers, teachers and mission-driven jobs like non-profit work), ditch the objective. While there are plenty of hiring managers willing to tell you outright that they don’t help, we put hard data behind it and found that it greatly reduces your chances of landing a job. If you aren’t a recent grad,  a writer or entering a profession that will get you called “a saint” leave it off.

For even more do’s and don’ts check out our in-depth rundown of all the things to avoid in an application. And if you’re tired of digesting tips, just let us handle it.

For just $10, we can optimize your resume, bulking it up or cutting it down to its leanest, meanest possible self and sending it out to the exact people who want to hire you. And this isn’t some wishy-washy soft science service, we use a trove of data and our own AI to ensure that your resume is the best it can possibly be and is only going to the hiring managers who want to hear from you.

How Long Does The Average Job Search Take?

Sarah –

I’ve been hunting for a 2 months and I’m starting to get discouraged. It’s been hard to keep my enthusiasm level high while working on a seemingly unending stream of cover letters and resumes. I just need to know there’s a light at the end of this tunnel of black ink on obsessed-over .pdfs.

My question is: how long does the average job search take? And how close am I to that point?

Thanks,
Impatient Applicant.

 

Hey Impatient,

If anyone understands how frustrating the job search can be, it’s us. I mean, we cared so much about the ways that the job search sucks that we started  a whole company just to make it better.

On paper, the wait time doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. We want the hunt to be quick and painless and the folks doing the hiring want talented candidates. You think this would make the hiring process quick, but unfortunately, people are still people and there are only so many hours for applying and reviewing in the day.

But don’t let it get you down. According to stats (our fave!) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the  average job search takes around 13 weeks. You’re almost there!

And if it doesn’t come in exactly that amount of time, know that it doesn’t mean anything is off about you or your work history. The tight labor market and low unemployment rate means that there are less jobs coming available. And the type of work your looking for can greatly effect the length of your job search.  We found that it could take mechanical engineers well over three months to find a spot and the average administrative assistant has to send over 200 job applications before being offered a job.

If you won’t believe me, take it from our CEO Kushal Chakrabarti:

There isn’t anything wrong with you. There are good, reasonable, scientific explanations for why it’s so hard to get a job right now. And even though people don’t talk about it, it’s hard for everyone.

Stay strong, folks.”

Hope this helps!

P.S. If you want to give your search a bit of gas, we can increase your chances of landing the job by 5x for just $10. Give our plans the once-over if you’re ready to let us do the hard work.

How Many Applications Do I Have To Send Out Before Getting A Job?

The job search can occasionally feel as effective as chucking a stack of resumes off of a seaside cliff. No doubt there’s more than one discouraged applicant out there feeling that they’re as likely to hear a response from a hiring manager as they would be to get a “do you mind?” from the ocean down below.

Job seekers can’t help but ask “how many applications does it take, on average, to land a job?” Unfortunately, we don’t have the hard science right now to give you a straight answer on that topic. But we can tell you why you’re having so much trouble. There are plenty of factors that are contributing to your applications disappearing into the void.

Our recent research found that only 13% of job applicants were given a job interview. And of those that managed to make it to the interview process, only a few people were offered a position. That puts your chances of landing the average job you apply for at less than 2%.

First, let us explain why most resumes end up in a black hole.

What Gives?

The average HR manager spends less than 7 seconds looking at the average resume. And they’re looking at your application with “no” on their minds, trying to find any reason to disqualify you. This is only after the hundreds of resumes have likely been picked over by a bot that scrapes resumes for appropriate keywords and chucks the ones it finds unsatisfactory.

The odds aren’t in your favor. But they aren’t in anyone’s favor, if we’re being honest. Does that help?

What To Do About It

We’re not here to help applicants wallow, we’re here to give them hope. After all, finding the right jobs for the right people is what we do. You need to bump up your application anyway that you can. Here’s a few quick ways that you can game the system to make sure that your resume lands in the lap of an HR manager and might even catch their eye.

 

 

Still not getting it?

We have your back. For just $10 a month, we can optimize your resume for you. We use AI to determine what it is that recruiters are looking for, scanning thousands of job openings and optimizing your resume to garner the biggest response. Then, we send that resume out for you to openings that match your particular skills. It’s a system that works, we guarantee it.

 

Here’s A Trick That Will Instantly Make Your Resume Better

Looking for help in the job search can be nearly as overwhelming as the search itself. There are a million different articles full of billions of tips and tricks that will help push your resume to the top of the pile (and we’re just as guilty in creating the clutter).

There’s checklists, templates and run-downs of Never-Ever-Evers. There’s recommendations on everything from how to format a resume on down to file type and font. It’s a lot to take in. So, knowing that you have a few more tabs open to look at, we’re here to offer one simple piece of advice. No top 5, no samples to download, just one tip that will get your resume noticed.

Use task/result sentences.

That’s really it. Fix your sentence formatting in your resume and your callbacks will increase. Hiring managers are looking for people who get results and this one trick of sentence structure will make you that person.

How it works:

A resume is a list of work you’ve done. Because of that, it lends itself to rote listing of your duties and responsibilities in the past. Even if your resume is impressive, laying out your daily to-do list to a stranger is bound to make their eyes gloss over.

Task/result sentences avoid this trap by telling the manager what the outcome of your work was and the ways in which you helped the company. Rather than telling them what you did, you’re telling them how the company fared because of your work. That’s bound to stick out in a sea of drab responsibility-listing.

Any examples?

The way you’re probably writing your resume currently looks something like this:

JOB A

  • Ran the Etcetera, Etcetera Campaign
  • Handled social media outreach
  • Organized the office space

But with task/result sentences, it can look like this:

JOB A

  • Launched a fundraising campaign that raised $10,000 in 8 weeks which extended runway for X months
  • Created a social media influencer outreach campaign that led to 10K new Twitter followers and 11% increase in monthly revenue
  • Led a space planning and reorganization workshop that freed up 160 square feet of office space for the company
    Here’s an additional job search tip. Always use numbers where you can. Quantifiable impacts are much-loved by hiring managers. It makes it that much easier to pitch your worth to the people in the company.

Of course, there’s more than just sentence structure to the job search. That’s where we can help. Our ResumeOptimizer and fully automated job search suite is only $10 and guarantees that you’ll hear back from a job you want.

What To Know On The Day Of Your Job Interview

Every job interview is going to be slightly different. But there are a few key ways in which they will always be the same. We’ve already gone over common questions that you should have a solid answer to before any interview, but don’t forget that an interview is a face-to-face interaction.

Getting wrapped up in your rote answers isn’t the way to go. The interviewer is there to have a conversation with another person and see if they’re a fit for the job, not listen to a series of monologues. Basically, you need to remember that the person on the other side of the desk is just that, a person. Treat them the way you’d expect to be treated and try and talk to them as naturally as possible.

Not to worry, though. If rote memorization is more your style, we have a handy checklist of day-of interview tips for you to run through.

Arrive On Time

You don’t want to start off with the person in charge of hiring you thinking you don’t value their time. If you arrive late and throw off their schedule for the rest of the day, they probably aren’t going to leave the interview with the most glowing portrait of you as a candidate. Plot your route and give yourself plenty of time to get there.

Good enough, Smart Enough and, Gosh darn it…

…people want to hire you. Don’t psych yourself out. If you weren’t qualified enough to catch their eye, they wouldn’t have called you at all. Keep it in mind to keep your confidence up throughout the interview.

Mirror, Mirror

If your interviewer is curt and formal, be curt and formal. If your interviewer is casual, be loose. If your interviewer sits backwards in their chair, they’re probably going to tell you about avoiding drugs. Let them and meet them where they are.

Be Polite

Please and thank you. Yes, sir and no, ma’am. Hold doors and shake hands firmly. Tell people it’s nice to meet them. If it helps, pretend your grandparents are in the room.

Remember Names and Follow Up

People like when you remember their names. People like when you express interest. Do both. Show that you’re committed to the job by asking after it and thanking them for talking to you.

You Gotta Get There First

To wow them, first you need to get in the room. That’s our specialty. We can optimize your resume and send it to the jobs you want for you. For just $10, we’ll turn the scrap parts of your application into a well-oiled machine, get it up and humming and let it generate results.

How To Research A Company Before A Job Interview

We know that the job hunt can be exhausting. All the digging, applying and letter-writing can really take a toll. But that doesn’t excuse shoddy research. If you’ve done enough to wow the hiring managers into calling you up to talk about the position, be sure that you at least sound like you know what you’re talking about. Nothing kills a job interview faster than not knowing about the company you’re trying to join.

Beyond the fact that it demonstrates basic competency and it’s just good manners, you definitely should do a little looking around to get a feel for a company before you’re standing in front of a recruiter’s desk. They can tell when you haven’t prepared and it’s a red flag for them that signals you might not be taking the position seriously.

Of course, if you don’t come from a research-heavy background, knowing how to find the information you need to effectively stunt on an interviewer can be tough. What questions should you even be asking? Luckily, as with all things job-search-related, we’re pros and we’ve got your back.

What To Ask

You can’t find the right answers without asking the right questions. So, here’s a few stock queries that you’ll want to know before any interview.

  • How did their company mission come to be, and does the press around the company support it?
  • What’s their primary product, and who is their customer?
  • Who are their direct (and indirect) competitors?

How To Find It

The company mission is almost always a simple find. Take a look around the website with an eye toward an “About” section. These typically include not only a plain statement of their company’s core values and what they wish to be, they also tend to feature biographical information that will let you know why they felt the need to start the company in the first place.

The primary product can typically be discerned via similar methods. Just look around their online presence to see what it is they are selling. Read over the copy to try and get an idea of who they are talking to if their customers aren’t immediately apparent.

Competitors can be found via a quirk of Google. Type in the name of the company followed by “vs.” and the search will auto-populate with companies that people are considering as an alternative to whatever Company X is offering.

For a deeper dive, search the news for stories about the company to see if it’s fulfilling its core mission or has made any big moves in the recent past. Beyond that, scanning the company’s profile on Crunchbase can give you crucial info about who is supporting the company and who works within it.

How To Use It

Try and incorporate your knowledge of the company into the discussion at an interview. Mention that you saw their most recent positive news in an answer. Ask what they’re doing to fight Competitor Y and offer a few ways that you could join in that scuffle. Talk about the ways that you find their product or mission useful.

If you appear to be engaged with the company, recruiters can’t help but notice.

Of course, you can’t wow a recruiter if you never get in the room with them. That’s where we come in. We can optimize your resume to guarantee that it catches the eye of potential employer and automatically send it to jobs matching your skill set. For just $10, we guarantee that you’ll get your shot to knock off some HR socks.

The Three Job Interview Questions You Should Have Down Pat

Preparing your resume for a new job is difficult, but not impossible. You have the benefit of time — no one is going to burst into the room and demand to look at your CV before you send it — and the comfort of multiple edits to help you feel alright about the part of your history you’re showing to the world.

Interviews are an entirely different beast. You only get one shot one opportunity to look great and whether or not you do is entirely based on your ability to improvise around an interviewer’s pet questions.

Here’s a sampling of a few odd questions I’ve personally been asked:

  • Can you fold a fitted sheet?
  • How do you feel about your name?
  • What kind of animal would you want to reincarnate as?
  • Thoughts on karaoke?
  • (In a windowless room) Which way is north?

These questions are meant to startle, to get you thinking creatively or to get a sense of your priorities without asking about them directly. And because they are so rare they can be hard to prepare for, leading to the dreaded moment of actually having to sit and think about your words before you say them (a big no-no in the job hunting world and nowhere else).

But you can smooth over any potential speed bumps by preparing yourself with a few solid answers to questions you know are going to be asked. I know we just said that interviewers are trying to rattle you with let-field queries, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few questions that almost every recruiter is going to ask.

Tell Me About Yourself

This is the opener for 99% of interviews for obvious reasons. It’s a good, open-ended way to get started talking about the subject at hand, allowing multiple jumping-off points for the interviewer to move forward with the conversation. Or, at least, it will if you don’t completely bungle it.

Knowing that this question is coming is half the battle, as a long-forgotten war hero said. And since you can almost guarantee that this question will kick off any interview, there’s no excuse for flubbing it.

The interviewer wants you to recap your experience in your own words, hopefully leading up to the point that you’re clearly qualified for this gig and ending in an explanation of why you decided to apply.

Job Search Tip: Write out your response, going through your history chronologically and run through it a few times until it feels natural.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

This question is truly tough. It flies in the face of a lifetime of home training, asking you to talk bluntly about things you’re good at. It’s akin to straight-up bragging, but within limits.

Both knowing how to brag on yourself and knowing when to stop are difficult, but that can be fixed if you think of it in terms of resume bullet points. What they want to hear is your most relevant skill backed by an example of you using that skill in the past. “I’m really good at X and I got that way doing Y.” Keep this formulation in mind when practicing for your next interview.

Weaknesses can be even trickier. You don’t want to share anything that might disqualify you, but you don’t want to give a non-answer that will leave the interviewer rolling their eyes. Be honest here and share something that you have struggled with in the past, but follow that up with an explanation of the steps you took or are taking to change that. They want to know that you’re self-aware and adaptable.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

This is a great one for all the dungeon masters out there, because it’s plotting out a bit of a fantasy. Imagine a magical land where job security is assured and you’ve found a job you like doing. Might as well throw in some orcs at that point, right?

What the interviewer wants to hear from you here is how you plan to grow at the company. What do you see yourself doing when you outgrow the position they have offered? What skills will you have honed by that time? And what passions will the job be fulfilling for you? You need to show that there’s something about the job that interests you and that you’ll be willing to grab that part of the gig and run with it.

Job Search Tip: Plot out several trajectories based on the requirements of the job at hand and try and use the one that you feel will resonate the best with the interviewer. If you need to know which skills they are looking for, look out for the points where they ask follow-up questions.

To even get to these questions, though, you have to leap some pretty big hurdles. That’s where we can help. Allow us to optimize your resume and automate your job search to ensure that you’re sweating over interview questions quicker. For just $10, we guarantee that we can land you the interviews you’ve been after.

 

Speed Up Your Job Search With A Cover Letter Cheat Sheet

We all know that sending the same canned cover letters to every job opening is a waste of time. Even if we ignore the fact that every job is different, making it impossible to meet all the requests of every posting in one single document, there’s the person on the other end to consider. Scanning cover letters is their actual job and they’ve developed a strong sense of when they’re being fed a form letter.How Long Should A Cover Letter Be?

It would be a  waste of time to send out letters about your [INSERT SKILLS] to [HR MANAGER NAME GOES HERE]. But writing custom letters from scratch for every application is an equally unjustifiable timesuck. Luckily, there’s a happy medium: a cover letter cheat sheet.

Whazzat?

A cover letter cheat sheet is a form of plug-and-play elements that you can insert into any letter depending on the asks and qualifications of the position you’re throwing in for. It gives you the ability to address the needs of every posting without writing out every last letter by hand.

Beyond the need to save time, a cheat sheet can also save you from costly mistakes. The more you have to type out, the greater chance of typos and other errors appearing in your application. With a cheat sheet, you only have to proof your premade paragraphs.

How’s It Work?

Make a list of skills that you think are relevant for the jobs in your field. It should be easy to find these, they are probably in the “Skills” section of your resume. For every skill, write out a paragraph explaining how you have used or came to possess that talent in the past.

Check out two examples below:

Skill Relevant Experience
Organization & Administration I honed my administrative and organizational skills during my time at SaveTheWhales.org. Tasked with taking minutes, case management, phoning patients, data entry and general filing, I’m able to handle any administrative duties given to me with little to no supervision.
Clinical Interviews During my time at the King County Health Department, I conducted hundreds of clinical interviews with AIDS victims. By being sensitive, sympathetic and understanding of their situation, I was able to distill useful information that subsequently helped educate the community on risk factors of the disease.

With this list of skills in hand, you can quickly customize any cover letter to address the needs of any position.

 

Of course, cover letters aren’t the only thing that need to be tweaked in order to catch a recruiter’s attention. And they are far from the only bit of the application process that can be a pain. Luckily, we can help!

For just $10, we can optimize your resume to make sure that it’s landing on the top of the pile. And we can take that clean, new resume and send it out to jobs you’re interested in on your behalf, automating your job search and landing you an interview that much faster.