Dear Addie — Should I follow up after submitting an application?

Dear Addie,

I have been submitting 10-20 applications per week. I’m including my resumé and custom cover letters specific to each company, but I’m not hearing anything back. Not even a rejection. I feel like my applications are being sent into a deep abyss. Should I follow up when I don’t hear back? And if so, when is a good time?

Thanks,
Applying into an Abyss

Dear AiaA,

First off, great work on keeping your application volume up. 10-20 applications per week is solid. It’s a pretty clear cause and effect scenario — the more applications you send, the more likely you are to get an interview, and so on. Even if every job application you send out isn’t a perfect match, it’s still a good idea to cast a wide net in hopes of landing an interview (and eventually a job offer).

The question still remains, though — are your applications getting lost in a deep abyss? It’s possible — and that’s exactly why you shouldn’t assume no response = no interest.

Should I Follow Up?

By all means, yes! You should follow up. I know, it seems pestering to contact an employer after an application is submitted. After all, wouldn’t they have just contacted you if they were interested?

Follow-ups can be tricky — you’re treading the fine line of being proactive and pushy. The reality, though, is application volume can be so high the hiring manager is equally as overwhelmed as the job seeker.

When Should I Follow-Up?

Is there a posting deadline? — Be mindful of the close date on the application. Do not contact the employer before the application even closes. Not only would be considered generally annoying, but it would be futile.

Wait until 5-7 days after the closing date to follow-up.

No posting deadline? — The same advice applies. Following-up 5-7 days after submitting the application, regardless of when you submit, is considered appropriate.

How Should I Follow-Up?

without coming off as annoying and/or desperate

This is probably the most important element to consider. If your application was never reviewed (and even if it was, hiring manager’s spend an average of six seconds looking at an application), this is your chance to make a positive first impression.

Keep it short and sweet. Don’t ask why you haven’t been contacted yet, but rather use this time as an opportunity to express genuine interest for the position available.

Should you pick up the phone or stick with an e-mail? It depends. Many applications explicitly state NO phone calls, in which case, the answer is pretty obvious. Simply do not call them. That’s a sure fire way to keep your resumé in the dark abyss forever.

On the other hand, if the application doesn’t discourage phone calls, this can be a pretty powerful follow-up tool — especially in an age where everything is textual and phones are really just miniature computers.

The key to a successful phone call? — Don’t call more than once. Consider it powerful ammo that you only need to deploy once. Keep it friendly and concise, using it as a brief introduction and and opportunity to get a handle on the timeframe for moving forward.

Writing an e-mail is also a great approach (and the only approach that is appropriate if the hiring manager wants to avoid phone calls…save showing up at the office, but we don’t really recommend that!). Again, it’s all about keeping it short and sweet.

Here’s a template you can easily customize:

Hello [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I hope this finds you well! I am following up on the open [position title]. I submitted my application and resume, and I would like to kindly ask for the timeline on the hiring process. I am very enthusiastic at the prospect of joining your team and leveraging [your specific skills, knowledge, and experience] to help you [what profit you’d bring to the company]. Please let me know if you need any more details about my application. I look forward to speaking with you and sharing my ideas on how to help you with your upcoming challenges.

Kind regards,

[Name]

[include contact info]


It’s really that simple. The hard part, which we can all relate to at some point in the job search, is accepting the reality that the employer may just not be interested. In which case, keep doing what you’re doing! If you’re tired of going at it alone, you can access one of our experienced hiring managers to help you along the way!

Cheers,

Dear Sarah – I’m a furloughed worker. What’s the quickest, most effective way to update my resume?

Hi Sarah,

As you probably know, US federal workers are currently working without pay. Unfortunately, being a federal worker myself, my family can’t sustain this for much longer (especially because I’m contract). I need another job right now. What’s the quickest way to update my resume?

Thank you,

Pay me Now

Hi PmN,

The current situation regarding federal employees is terrible and “moonlighting” to supplement your income isn’t a solution, as has been suggested. So, let’s get to it. Here’s the quick and dirty for improving/updating your resume in 20 minutes:

Add Numbers

Using concrete numbers provides you with a hireabilty increase of 40.2%! We recommend for every 3 sentences, use at least 1 number to demonstrate your (concrete) impact. 

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Put yourself in the shoes of a hiring manager. Who would you rather hire:

Helped increase sales by 31% by working with Operations Manager to reduce time to 1st customer reply.

Collaborated with Operations Manager improve customer reply times.

Cut the Fat

Every word on your resume should have purpose. Clean-up your resume and retain precious resume real estate by taking out the following:

  • Objectives 
  • “Resume/CV” at the top of the page or “References provided upon request” at the bottom
  • Your photograph
  • Any usage of “I” or “My”. (Write in the 3rd person.)
  • Generic list of skills
  • Irrelevant job experience(s)
  • “Weird” interests/hobbies

Know when to apply

Apply on Mondays (don’t apply on Fridays or Saturdays).

Apply before 10am.

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Meeting ~50% of job “requirements” is good enough. Don’t hesitate!

Additionally, apply to 150-250 jobs. Despite the low unemployment rate, the job market is extremely competitive. Everyone, regardless of credentials and work history, can expect to send out hundreds of resumes…so, start auditing your resume right now.

As an added bonus, we’d like to offer all furloughed federal workers a free membership and would encourage you to connect with us ASAP. Please send an email to [email protected] and our team will help you find a job 5.8x faster.

Best,

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Dear Sarah – How do I “network” if I don’t have a network?

Hi Sarah,

I just graduated from college where I was primarily a commuter, non-trad student. I believe because of this, my professional network is pretty small. How do I go about expanding my network and gain valuable connections?

Thanks,

Out at Sea

Hi OaS,

Consider what a ‘network’ means. Did you partake in any college activities, intramural sports, or clubs? Did you volunteer or hold an internship? Your network is everyone in your life (including friends and family) that you’ve connected or worked with that can speak to your character, work ethic and abilities. Everyone has a network. Intentionally expanding your network is another story.

Making connections in a “networking” setting (i.e.: a ‘Meetup’ or industry conference) is all about mutual generosity. Simply put, what do you have that another person would enjoy learning about or utilizing?

Networking Tip #1: Context

Be visible!

Whether you insert yourself intentionally such as asking second degree connections for someone’s info or making yourself available to various communities you’re fighting 2/3 of the battle. LinkedIN is a great way to message people for introductions and request a coffee date from someone whose profile you admire. The best part about LinkedIN is that everyone expects to be professionally messaged, be it recruiters or 3rd degree connections within your industry. Don’t shy away from putting yourself out there in various ways.

Also, use your alumni association! You didn’t just pay big money for 4 years; alumni associations are forever.

Networking Tip #2: Follow-up

You’d be amazed at how many people make the effort to attend events and simply don’t follow-up with their contacts post-interaction. Shoot them a quick email/message on LinkedIN after 24 hours –

Hi there [new contact’s name],

It was great to meet you at [event name] on [date]. I had a great time talking with you about [topic discussed]. Regarding your LinkedIn profile, it says you’re currently working on [current job/organization/side project]—and [relay how it relates to you]. Are you free to grab coffee?

Best,

[You]

It’s honestly that simple. Keep track of who you met and where, make a networking goal for yourself every month (it’s ok to start with 1!), and be genuine and helpful.

Best,

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Dear Sarah – Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Hi Sarah,

I asked my boss for a raise but he said I didn’t deserve it so I sent him my resignation letter. Now he is asking me to stay with a higher salary.

Should I accept his offer or start my job search?

Best,

Lost and Confused

Hi LaC,

70-80% of people who accept counteroffers either leave or are let go within a year.

Why? Counteroffers are retention tools. It takes a great deal of time, energy and money to rehire, something that employers typically prefer to avoid all together. While accepting a counteroffer may seem workable in the short-term, you have already established yourself as untrustworthy. It’s difficult to overcome being viewed in this light and may affect the types of projects you’re given or future pay hikes.

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Start looking for a new job. In the future, should you need a raise, here is my advice: appeal to your employer’s priorities without being threatening (i.e.: presenting them with ultimatums or resignations).

There’s a lot to be said for the spirit of cooperation-

“I’ve been receiving a bunch of competing offers as of late. I’m not interested and I’m definitely not thinking about leaving, as I love my team and appreciate the direction this company is going. I understand the company can’t match these offers, but I was wondering if we can close the gap a bit. If not, of course I understand.”

The above example speaks to an understanding and awareness that any employer would appreciate. You’re not requesting a match, but a bump. Asking for a raise isn’t an art form; it can be as easy and straightforward as understanding your manager’s priorities and goals.

Pro-tip: If/When you’re actively interviewing for a new position and you’re inevitably asked “So why are you choosing to leave your current job”, it’s important to remember you are interviewing the company, as well. Let the company sell themselves a bit: “I’m very happy with my current job. I learned from [recruiter name/referral] of the interesting work you’re doing and I’m always open to new opportunities.”

Good luck!

(P.S. Connect with one of our talented mentors [former hiring managers] for interview practice and more advice regarding how to navigate the counteroffer!)

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Dear Sarah – Was my resume trashed?

Hi Sarah,

What do hiring managers absolutely hate seeing on resumes/CVs? What would get you automatically disqualified?

Best,

DQ

Hi DQ,

There are many things that might disqualify you as a candidate. Recruiters and hiring managers default to saying ‘no’ due to their own time constraints; identifying ‘red flags’ becomes second nature when there’s an overwhelming candidate pool. I’ll touch on a few:

First, avoid dumb mistakes. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation challenged resumes are the worst offender. Why? It’s avoidable with basic proofreading (and do so more than once). Don’t expect your spellcheck to catch everything, like, ‘higher’ instead of ‘hire. (Yep, we’ve seen it.)

job-applications-spammy

Earlier this year, we were actively hiring to fill a position on the TalentWorks team. Of the 426 applicants for our last job, 25% (108 applicants) was basically spam, e.g. outsourcers, recruiters. Almost 10% (40 applicants) made dumb mistakes, e.g. misspellings, forgot to include their email!

Second, a resume without a clear indication of professional progression is another potential ‘red flag’. Hiring managers look for promotions within the same company,  title changes and a logical career flow. If your resume indicates a career plateau (or a career gone backwards, so-to-speak) make sure you add color to your cover letter. (Don’t forget the cover letter!)

Thirdly, if you’re a mid-level employee applying for a ‘lower position’ make sure your resume doesn’t indicate over-qualification, another potential ‘red flag’. Only indicate relevant work history and degrees. Focus on the exact skills and responsibilities highlighted in the job description, which will help distract from titles. 

Lastly, another (very) avoidable mistake that will immediately disqualify you from candidacy is a failure to follow directions. If the job posting asks you to include/attach certain documents, list a salary requirement or fill out their online resume form (I know, I know, it’s tedious)…just do it because there are plenty of people who won’t hesitate.

Good luck!

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How do I build a resume if I don’t have a ton of professional experience?

Dear Sarah,

I’m a recent college grad applying to jobs. The thing is, I don’t have a lot of ‘pertinent’ experience for these positions and have only worked retail while in school. What is the best way to flesh out my resume?

Best,

Coming up short

Hi Short,

First off, good on you for holding down a job while at school. Regardless of the position, be it retail related or an internship, balancing both speaks volumes about your work ethic…which leads me to my point.

Many hiring managers expect that a recent college graduate has a limited work history for obvious reasons; it’s how you sell yourself that matters. Even people with minimal or no professional experience possess relevant skills (i.e.: strong work ethic, creativity, etc). Using your example, a retail job requires sales leadership, communication and people management; these are all pertinent responsibilities that could span any job. (PS- We’ve worked with jobseekers that have taken their retail experience, pursued positions in tech recruiting, and are now working at Salesforce ;))

Include a “Key Skills” section in your resume highlighting your abilities.

Doing so will increase your chances for an interview by almost 60%. Use exact wording from the job post when applicable, as well. Even smaller companies use resume parsers (or ‘ATS’) and this will help get you to the next step of the process.

Identify actual ‘entry-level’ positions.

We recently did a little experience and analyzed 95,363 Marketing Assistant jobs, 52% (49,245) were supposedly entry-level (based on what the employer said). Of those, our hypothetical job-searcher — a Marketing Assistant in LA, say — was only interested in 3% (1,286). Of those 1,286 supposedly entry-level Marketing Assistant and other jobs, we found 240 for actual entry-level Marketing Assistants.

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It’s unfortunate that many supposedly entry level positions require experience and it certainly takes time to seek them out. With a bit of patience, you can identify the ~5% of jobs that actually match your needs. (We can help, as well!)

One last point: Our data suggests that recent college grads with <1 year of work experience who had an explicit ‘objective’ listed got 7% more interviews. It may seem statistically insignificant, but these little resume alterations add up!

Good luck!

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Can I include something in my resume that isn’t 100% accurate?

Dear Sarah,

I’d like to apply to a position where I’m sorta familiar with the technology required to do the job. Would it be “okay” to say I’m well-versed and then learn on the job? I believe I’d otherwise be a great fit.

Best,

Fibber Mcgee

Hi FM,

Sure, you can speak to your fake skills in a resume to land a job…but, you really shouldn’t. Seriously

According to HireRight’s 2017 employment screening benchmark report, 85% of employers found their candidates had lied on their resume; this is a 25% jump from five years ago!

Though it may seem innocent, embellishing skills on a resume will inevitably put you in an awkward position where at the very least you’ve started a professional relationship with a lie. If the hiring manager finds out you puffed up your qualifications, they’re likely to fire you.

Some of the more crazy fibs we’ve seen have ranged from falsifying university degrees (and graduation dates) to completely stolen work histories where the resume and cover letter don’t match at all. In an age where we’re more connected than ever, it only takes a quick Google search on the part of the recruiter to learn about candidates if there’s any ambiguity. Also, it’s not uncommon for a hiring manager to contact people via LinkedIN that aren’t your listed references; there are no laws restricting them from doing this. In fact, 70% of employers do independent background checks on future hires such as snooping their social media accounts.

It’s been said on this blog numerous times that making your resume machine parsable (with the same exact words from the job description) is fundamental. We’ve also emphasized how important it is to apply to jobs even if you only have 60% of the job qualifications. Of equal import is understanding that lying your way to an interview is absolutely not worth the risk.

All the best!

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How should I include ‘soft skills’ in my resume?

Dear Sarah,

What are “soft skills” and how would I go about representing them on my resume?

Best,

Big Softy

Hey there Softy,

Soft skills” are skills that can’t be quantified or measured such as “time management” or “problem solving”. Sure, a soft skill is less tangible than say a certification having learned Python, but it’s valuable and should be represented on a resume. The question is how to do so effectively.

Let’s take the soft skill ‘critical thinking’ as an example. Our data suggests that quantifying the impact that you made with numbers helps remove subjective bias, increasing your hireability by +23%. Demonstrating your critical thinking skill along with data-driven examples is a double-whammy:

  • “Audited departmental retention program and piloted new project that increased return purchase by 27% Q1”

Not only does this example demonstrate that you broke down a problem in order to better it understand it, but it shows the positive effect after having implemented your changes.

Many times in the job listing the hiring manager or recruiter will indicate specifically what soft skills are required. For instance, if the job listing requests that this candidate possesses ‘superior communication skills’, literally put ‘superior communication skills’ in the ‘Key Skills’ section of resume. Remember that the majority of companies today use resume parsers to widdle down large applicant pools. Using exact words in your resume will help you get to the next round. (Don’t forget that ‘Key Skills’ section, either! Including one automatically improves your chances for an interview by 59%!)

All the best!

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Should I list my hobbies on a resume?

Dear Sarah,

I’m updating my resume and I was wondering when (if ever) it’s acceptable to list my hobbies.

Thanks,

Renaissance Man

Hey RM,

If you were to ask me this question even 7 years ago I’d be inclined to say ‘no’, and that doing so is superfluous and unprofessional. Times have changed. Today, companies especially small businesses and start-ups not only ask about relevant work experience but also want to know about what you do outside of work. Here are a couple tips for doing so gracefully:

Context is King

Hobbies need to be relevant. If you’re applying to a job at Salesforce, for example, think to yourself what hobbies might help you best fit into their culture. Salesforce in particular emphasizes giving back to the community, even offering their employees seven paid days of volunteer time off each year. If you’re passionate about working animal adoption events on the weekends it would absolutely benefit you to mention it.

Less is More

Don’t go overboard. If you’re going to mention hobbies, chose a couple. Listing 10, for instance, is overwhelming and starts to tread into irrelevancy. Also, resumes should never be longer than one page, so if you need to sacrifice precious real estate to include them, don’t do so at all.

Use Action words

We’ve found that using distinctive action words at the beginning of your sentences increases your hireability by 139.6%! Instead of just listing your hobbies in a clump (i.e.: Hiking, puzzles, traveling, volunteering) provide full sentences such as, ‘Organized and lead a nonprofit aimed at feeding the hungry’. This particular example displays leadership skills. We also found that incorporating 1-2 leadership-oriented words every 5 sentences provides a +50.9% boost over the competition.

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So remember, if you’re applying to a startup or a company that offers a playful culture such as Google including a relevant hobby that demonstrates your leadership qualities can set you apart! Make sure you use an action word to do so and if it means a resume longer than a page, leave it out.

Hope that helped!

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Unemployment is at a record low. Where’s my job?

Dear Sarah,

Apparently, unemployment is at 3.9%…but, I’m still looking for a job. How do I reconcile this and, you know, find one?

Thanks,

Feeling Alone Right Now

Hey FARN,

Jobless rates are at a five-decade low having just recently dipped from 4% (2/10 of a percentage point lower than it’s record low in The 60s). Significant!

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US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Understandably, this is frustrating to read if you’re an active job seeker. Job hunting sucks and there are a variety of factors that are stacked against you of which you have no control.

‘What are you not doing’, you ask?

Here are a few data-backed tips that may help:

The Job Search… just go for it!

If you meet more than 60% of the job qualifications, you should apply! Many people, in particular women, will avoid applying if they’re not 100% qualified. Apply to as many jobs as you can to make up for the fact that any single job you apply for online is nearly zero.

Your Resume

Not only should you have a simple machine-parsable resume format but you should include as many keywords as possible in your resume AND cover letter from the original job posting.

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Also, describe your job achievements with different action verbs. This one resume tip is is associated with +139.6% boost in getting more interviews. Literally, all you have to do is change the first word in your resume skill set to an action word and it increases your chances of an interview over competition by +140%! Also, if you describe the different things that you did at that company with different action verbs, you’ll have finished strong.

In Person

If you’ve made it to the interview stage of your job search journey you have a solid chance of getting the job. Be your charming self and relax knowing that you’ve made it this far.

Oh, and be sure to get the earliest appointment you can in the day when interviewing. Interviewers get hangry.

All the best!

 

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