Overcoming Your Employment Gaps

The main ‘problem’ with resume employment gaps is that it requires explanation. Gaps raise red flags to employers and may imply that you weren’t let go voluntarily. The good news is that if you’ve secured an interview, there are other factors that positively outweighed the gap. So, how do you minimize the damage and own your employment history?

Your Resume: Ditch the typical timeline format

Understand that you can get creative with your resume format and are not at all beholden to a chronological timeline. Place your ‘Key Skills’ section at the top to fortify your value prop up front; having this section also increases your hireability by 60%! When you do list your work experience make sure that you include any volunteer/pro bono opportunities (paid and unpaid) that you may have had during that gap of time.

Your Cover letter: Tell Your Story

Whether you took time to raise your children, travel the world, care for an ailing family member, were laid off, or were fired this is your chance to put your spin on why there is a gap on your resume:

“I took a year off to raise my baby, but I’m excited to re-enter the workforce as I have support at home to thankfully do so. While raising my daughter I worked remotely and volunteered with various non-profits to keep my marketing skills sharp. I managed several large email campaigns, ran their social media platforms and taught myself database computer programming. I believe that working with your organization would be a great way to put my marketing skills to work in a new setting.”

Your Interview: Be Confident + Honest

The good news is you have overcome a large hurdle in that your qualifications trumped your employment gap on paper. Now, let your positivity shine through in the interview. Regardless of how large your employment gap is, you want to come across and excited and motivated to progress in your career. Avoid oversharing anything personal and focus on re-entry and what your hoping to professionally achieve at the job at hand.

Conclusion

Life happens and many employers understand. If you have an employment gap know that your story and how you convey it matters more than the gap itself. It’s also an opportunity for the employer to learn more about your character and goals. For example, there is a lot to be said for someone who takes time to care for a family member or who volunteers their time after they’ve been laid off. Feel empowered to tell your story.

Quick note: Remember that an interview is a two-way street, so-to-speak. As the candidate, you are also making sure that the job at hand is right for you. If the employer has a problem with your gap or doesn’t agree the best thing to do is to walk away. Life is complex and situations arise; employers that do not understand that ‘stuff happens’ will most likely be inflexible in the future.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

3 Tips to ‘Storify’ Your Resume

Beyond tips and tricks, ‘dos’ and ‘don’ts’, the ultimate purpose of a resume is to tell a story. Your story. Hiring managers rely on resumes to make the case that the candidate being represented is the best person for the job. So, how do you tell a compelling story using a standard resume?

Looks Matter

Resume real estate is extremely valuable, in that you only have 1 page to make an impression. There’s much debate around acceptable resume length, but at the end of the day less in more when time is against you. Achieving the right balance with an effective usage of white space is the cornerstone of any resume, as are bullet points and a consistent use of italics, boldface type and capitalization.

Hiring managers will not spend time looking for the key facts that make you the perfect candidate, so your formatting must do that for them.

Pro-tip: Your font size should never be less than 10pt or more than 12pt. We recommend the following fonts- Tahoma, Arial, Century Gothic, Bookman, Garamond, Verdana, Cambria, and Times New Roman.

Include Unique Sections

All resumes should have the following 4 sections, regardless:

  • Contact Info
  • Experience Section
  • Education Section
  • Key Skills Section

but, beyond the standard there are many ways to further your story with unique sections. For instance, hobbies, volunteer work, training/certifications, honors, associations, languages, and projects are all great selling points for being a good cultural fit and generally a well-rounded professional.

Pro-tip: People who used even one personal pronoun in their employment section (not the objective or professional summary section) had a -54.7% lower chance of getting an interview callback.

Consider Relevancy

No one likes a long and boring story; too much information is difficult to navigate. Forcing every job you’ve had onto one page isn’t necessary nor advisable. Instead of describing your day-to-day job responsibilities focus on what you did. Obviously, the hiring manager knows what the job itself entails so by focusing on your personal accomplishments you’re crafting a narrative that grabs the reader’s attention.

Consider why you’re listing various items and how that will ultimately improve your candidacy. 

Pro-tip: Past work experience should be written in the past tense.

Conclusion

The climax of your “story” is your goal: to get the job. ‘Storifying’ your resume helps create an image beyond bullet points and highlights your professional accomplishments in a unique, memorable way.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

 

Computers Aren’t Sexist: AI + Recruiting

Recently it was reported that Amazon had scrapped their machine learning recruitment system because it was favoring male candidates. Their machine learning team spent years developing a way to automate the hiring process using a decade worth of past Amazon employee resumes; they would soon learn in doing so the system had taught itself to strategically weed out female candidates. For instance, any resume with the word ‘women’s’ in it was immediately downgraded and scored lower.

What gives? Learned historical data based on past hiring decisions will always produce a biased system because human beings are inherently, and (mostly) unconsciously biased.

Using our own AI technology, TalentWorks pinpoints the biases of hiring managers by analyzing and sampling 100,000+ jobs from our index of 91 million job postings. In doing so we’re able to identify the norms and outliers of the industry such as the number of applications per interview and how that relates to the greater labor market. Example: Racial bias.

How much does race still matter in the US job market?

racism-job-interviews-black-asian-hispanic.png

After analyzing thousands of job applications, outcomes and applicants, we discovered several key things:

  1. Non-white job applicants got 2.3x fewer interviews than their white counterparts;
  2. For non-white job applicants, if a resume mistake reinforced a racist stereotype, it basically disqualified them.

Through our data, we’ve found the following contributes significantly to combatting racial bias:

  • Limit the number of collaboration-oriented words in your resume, such as, “team player”, “helped”, and “assisted”. Doing so will improve your chances for objectivity by 63%.
  • Anchor your experience by using industry buzzwords and acronyms. This increases objectivity by 34%.
  • Use concrete numbers; specifically, for every 3 sentences use 1 number to demonstrate your impact. Especially for people of color, quantifying the impact that you made with numbers helps remove subjective bias (+23% boost).

Returning to gender bias, we’ve actually found that resumes with obviously female names had a +48.3% higher chance of getting an interview. Names such as ‘Monica’, ‘Zoe’, ‘Ashley’ and ‘Evelyn’ had a significant boost over men comparatively.

women-men-more-hireable-job-search.png

This isn’t incredibly surprising when compared to what happened at Amazon, another tech company with a stark talent problem (men make up 73% of professional employees and 78% of senior executives and managers). The greater labor market suggests that there is an immense benefit for hiring womenWomen are outperforming men in school, and most recruiters are women (who want to support other women).

‘Tech’ is just one industry Talentworks analyzes. Our data is based on thousands of applications, applicants and outcomes across 681 cities and 140+ different roles/industries. Artificial intelligence and deep learning are the future of recruiting. We hope to empower jobseekers to find their ideal position.

Methodology

First, we randomly sampled 100,000 jobs from our index of 91 million job postings. We extracted the number of years of experience, job level and employment type for each job using TalentWorks’ proprietary parsing algorithms. We then used a blended Gaussian-linear kernel to calculate experience densities. Finally, we used an averaged ensemble of multiple independent RANSAC iterations to robustly calculate inflations against outliers. This was done in python with pandas, sklearn and scipy and plotted with bokeh.

Why Are We Doing This?

We can boost the average job-seeker’s hireability by 5.8x right now with ApplicationAssistant. But, what makes ApplicationAssistant work has been an internal company secret until now. We’re fundamentally a mission-driven company and we believe we can help more people by sharing our findings. So that’s exactly what we’re going to do.

Creative Commons

We’re not only sharing this data but also sharing all of it under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. In other words, as long as you follow a few license terms, this means you can:

  • Share: Copy, redistribute the material in any medium or format.
  • Adapt: Remix, transform, and build upon the material.

How to overcome a hiring manager’s bias

In an ideal world, candidates would compete for jobs on an even playing field. Unfortunately, hiring managers are human and predisposed to inherent bias. If your resume makes it through the ATS (“applicant tracking system”) what type of biases exist and is there anything you, the jobseeker, can do?

Bias #1: Ageism

Our data suggests that your hireability starts dropping by ~8% every year after age 35. Yes, it’s illegal for companies to base hiring decisions around age, but it inevitably happens. Although The Age Discrimination in Employment Act allows legal protection against employers blatantly adding age preferences in job listings, many older workers will hear such things as “You wouldn’t be happy here” or the ever present “You’re too qualified” that are thinly veiled ways of saying your age matters.

So, what do you do if you’re nearing 35? We highly recommend leaving out your graduation dates on your resume and LinkedIN page.

chart

Bias #2: Resume ‘Blemishes’

More than age, race or experience, having even one employment blemish (such as a firing or layoff) was the biggest factor affecting the job search.

fired-laid-off-worst-job-search

Candidates who were fired, laid off or quit in the first 15 months of a job were 43% less hireable when applying to new jobs. Comparatively, their callback rate for interviews was 55% less than people who did not have a resume blemish. Averaging across industries and cities, getting fired meant roughly same as wiping out ~5 years of experience for them.

If you’re applying to jobs with a recent blemish on your resume we recommend concentrating your search around smaller companies. Applications to companies with <500 employees had a 192% higher interview rate. For every additional 1,000 employees, the hireability for people with work blemishes dropped by 19%.

Bias #3: Your Name

If you’re Asian or Hispanic-American and make a resume faux-pas on your resume (such as a misspelling or forget to include your email address) you are penalized much more than white applicants.

Force an objective mindset if you have a non-white name and you’ll increases your interview rate up to +199%. This roughly translated to closing the racial discrimination gap in hiring by 54% (a 1.6x race penalty vs. 2.3x originally). How do you force objectivity? Using concrete numbers to demonstrate your impact will boost your hireability by 23% and help remove subject bias. Also, adding industry buzzwords and acronyms will give you 34% hireability boost.

Conclusion

It’s hard enough that employers give a resume about 6 seconds to decide whether they’ll proceed, but throw in age, a layoff, and an “exotic” last name and the odds of an interview are stacked against you significantly. Take care that you’re being reviewed as fairly as possible by formulating a resume that stands up to potential bias in the hiring world.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

 

Prove You’re a Leader On Your Resume (even if you’re not)

Regardless of whether or not you’re specifically applying to a managerial position, all hiring managers like to see leadership skills represented on a resume. “Leaders” are inherent problem identifiers and solvers, efficiently pivot when necessary and have great communication skills. Demonstrating that you possess these attributes will increase the likelihood that you will snag an interview. Our data suggests that using leadership keywords automatically increases your hireabilty over 51%!

demonstrating-leadership-resume-tip-1 (1)

It’s all about catching the eye of the hiring manager. Using specific words like communicated, managed, coordinated, leadership, and organized prove your competency as a leader. So what if you don’t have any leadership experience to speak of? Use the following qualities to beef up your leadership prowess:

Creativity

Are there projects that you helped conceptualize to completion? Was there a creative way you approached a problem? Hiring managers want to see creativity in action! Provide situational examples in your resume or cover letter along with your creative skills to qualify your potential.

Loyalty

People whose shortest job was 9+ months were 85% more hireable than people whose shortest job was 8 months or less. A solid, steady career history shows future employers that you’re committed to both a place and a team.

(Sometimes leaving a company is beyond our control. Learn how to navigate resume blemishes here.)

Communication

Communication skills for leaders include written, technical, verbal and non-verbal qualities. Every good leader understands the importance of communication within the constructs of their immediate team and company as a whole. Include examples where you’re communicating goals and achieving them. This is a great opportunity to plug-in relevant buzzwords! For example, a non-verbal communication skill might be your ability to visualize the greater picture. (Don’t forget to use the exact words in the job description!)

Conclusion

There are many ways to example your potential to lead even if you don’t possess specific managerial experience. Increase your chances for an interview (and potentially a better paying job) by emphasizing leadership qualities. (Remember- If you qualify for at least 60% of the job, don’t hesitate to apply!)

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

How to Focus your Job Search

The job hunt is a full-time job in and of itself. From networking to writing dozens of personalized cover letters every day, managing your time is fundamental. How do you do so without spinning your wheels, becoming complacent, or going bonkers?

Create a Daily ‘To-Do List’

When you’re at home looking for a job, routine keeps you honest. Make a job search specific list of items you wish to accomplish during the day. Having both daily and weekly goals will motivate smaller successes and help you to keep track of your accomplishments.

Here is an example:

Today’s Goals:

1.) Connect with 3 LinkedIn connections

2.) Follow-up on 5 positions

3.) Apply to 10 jobs

4.) Reach out to 1 2nd degree connection at XYZ Company and request an informal interview over coffee (my treat, of course) to learn more about their experience working there

Weekly Goal(s):

1.) Attend 1 networking ‘meetup’ this week

2.) Search for pro-bono projects

Figure out what you want

Whether you were laid-off, fired, left early of your own volition, or are looking while working, give yourself time to think concretely regarding your next step. In many ways, this may be the most fundamental aspect of the search.

Why? Without assessing where you currently are in your career and why you’re there you are simply going through the motions and may very well end up in the same position in the near future. Make this transition count and it will have been worth the process. 

Give yourself ‘me’ time

Incorporating time to yourself is another extremely important aspect of the job search. Looking for a new job can easily be all-consuming and borderline mentally draining. Avoid constantly checking your phone for recruiter emails. In fact, you might consider snoozing all notifications for a couple hours a day. You’d be amazed what closing your laptop and taking a walk does for your search.

Consider Smaller Companies

Our data suggests that applying to companies with <500 employees gives you 192% higher interview rate; this especially helps mitigate the effects of a recent firing or layoff. Regardless of your industry preference, this may be worth considering.

hireability-employer-size-layoff-fired

Conclusion

Understanding that the job search is another life skill to be mastered will help you to focus your energy and better manage your time. Everyone who needs a job (which is most people) will do this in their lifetime and those who succeed above the rest do so with organization, ambition, and grace. Give yourself the tools to get the job you deserve.

Need some help getting focused? For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

Public, Private, Non-profit: What sector works for you?

Are you looking for a job environment where you’re provided on the job training?

Do you prefer a ‘scrappy’ business setting?

Does working for your city or town interest you? 

Job seekers have many decisions to make. Along with overthinking if you should update your social profiles again or if you should wear a suit, your preference and adaptability regarding different job sectors will inevitably be another decision. The public, private and non-profit sectors all have their own rewards, opportunities, and challenges and it’s up to you to decide what best represents your style of work.

“I enjoy stability, an unambiguous pay-scale, and good benefits”

The public sector constitutes public goods and government services such as public education or law enforcement. Employees who work within this sector enjoy a level of job security that is not offered in private or non-profit organizations. For instance, you wouldn’t have to worry about a possible merger or being sold off to a private company. If you’re interested in making a difference, there are many types of public sector jobs you can explore.

Although a government job offers steady raises and good health benefits/retirement plans there are of course challenges such as slow growth and lack of control. Bureaucracy frustrates both citizens and governmental workers where formal processes are the name of the game.

“I’m looking for significant advancement opportunities, cutting-edge projects, and a high earning potential”

Private sector jobs in the US offer an incredible opportunity for personal and professional advancement with a nice salary to match. According to the National Treasury Employees Union, employees working the private sector received up to a 26% higher salary than federal employees with similar roles. Private sector companies, or ‘for profit’ organizations, offer less bureaucratic protocols which equates to new project approvals and faster iteration in general.

Private sector opportunities also have its challenges. More job instability and less of a guarantee that you’ll be provided with a good healthcare package is a reality that some jobseekers can’t afford to face.

“I’m seeking meaningful work, flexibility, and a highly motivated group of coworkers”

Non-profit organizations consist of both public charities and private foundations and in many ways represents a hybrid of both sectors (i.e.: non-profits/NGOs receive better treatment by the government and are viewed charitably by citizens).

A non-profit organization allows for a great deal of opportunity, as the average employee may find themselves wearing many hats given that their workforce is often understaffed. You will have opportunities to learn what every level of management does (including your boss’ boss) and quickly grow far beyond “your” role. For example, you could be a financial analyst helping to organize the annual gala or the office administrator doing grant research. If you want experience working across various departments and a way to change careers easily, the non-profit sector represents a great way for ambitious people to find on the job training.

Cons? The nonprofit sector faces unique stresses and daily challenges. For one, working environments may consist of antiquated technology and fewer resources. Many well-intentioned people get easily burned out being stretched too thin especially when the stakes are higher.

Conclusion

Whether you decide to start applying to a city job, local start-up or charity there are varying pros and cons you must weigh. Depending on your individual career goals you may find something that either frustrates you or takes your career to new heights.

Need help navigating a job interview within a particular sector? For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

Why Smaller Companies Are Better Early on in Your Career

The allure of large, name-brand companies such as Google, Edward Jones, Deloitte and Hyatt (all included in Forbes 100 Best Places to Work 2018) is understandable. Great perks, brand association, more resources, and exposure to the workings of core business on a large scale (i.e.: processes, performance, making an impact, etc.) make for an environment that can help you reach your career goals…maybe.

Although the corporate mold has major benefits in some respect, applying to smaller or medium-sized companies (<200) especially early on in your career will not only increase your transferable skillset but foster a ‘think outside the box’ mentality that will serve you in any working environment.

You’ll quickly learn a ton.

With varied responsibilities that don’t always fit your job description, you’re expanding your skillset on a regular basis. Getting to wear multiple hats and work cross-functionally with different departments is a highly sought after professional attribute in any business setting.

Creatures of habit will balk at change in responsibility, and if not presented correctly (i.e.: not being offered the proper resources to help you succeed) this type of transition can be stressful. Ultimately for your budding career, more opportunity is best and employees that work in smaller companies are visible and less likely to be siloed where they can’t professionally grow.

You’ll have more influence.

In a small business setting, the work you do is naturally more visible. For this reason, you’re able to make a tangible impact on a daily basis. Larger companies may offer a built-in support system but the connections you make at a smaller company where your immediate team and beyond are regularly witnessing your wins and contributions arguably makes for intimate references and networking connections.

Your professional success is vital to the success of a small business and this is a huge motivator for managers to make themselves to you. Your first job(s) are learning experiences and your boss/mentors have a great deal of information and experience to share. In larger companies (perhaps where the bottom line isn’t the #1 goal) it may be more difficult to gain access to your manager.

More flexibility to discover what works for you.

Larger businesses have corporate policies and regulations that are put in place regarding what an employee can and cannot do; not doing so would absolutely burden a corporate structure of 500+ employees. Smaller companies inherently have the wiggle room to offer things like flexible work schedules/breaks, adaptability in hiring, and even work from home options. This fosters a certain work ethic early on in your career where trust between yourself and your manager/co-workers is vital. There is no room to take advantage of long breaks everyday as your presence is noticed.

Applying to smaller businesses and start-ups requires a different approach. If you’re looking for guidance in how to get a small business interview (or what jobs would best fit your skills), we can help.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

5 Tips for Beating Imposter Syndrome in Job Interviews

“What gives me the right to be at this interview?” 
“Do I belong here?”
“Did their HR make a mistake?”

 

Is it difficult to communicate your accomplishments during interviews? Do you feel as if what is on paper doesn’t represent the “real you”?

Many people suffer from interview jitters, but for some it’s an all-consuming feeling where they believe themselves a fraud and their interview a complete fluke despite their quality as a candidate. This persistent feeling of self-doubt may also sometimes hamper a candidate’s chance of moving forward in the hiring pipeline if they are coming across as unconfident. It’s called ‘imposter syndrome’ (IP) and many people from all walks of life will experience it in their lifetime. 

In job interviews especially, the last thing you would want to do is discount your achievements and have trouble remembering all the awesome projects you managed. So, how do you beat it during the interview process?

Familiarity will calm your nerves

Do your homework. Research typical interview questions for your specific job title and of course the company itself. Glassdoor is a great resource for checking out the specific questions candidates were asked and their overall interview experience. (Of course, take it with a grain of salt as everyone’s experience differs.) Realize that it is normal to expect to learn new skills in a new job and practice how you are going to frame questions around areas you need to improve.

Your internal dialogue isn’t reality

You may think you’re tanking the interview, but understand that the hiring manager sees something different and even expects some level of nervousness. While you’re overthinking how they must be perceiving you, you’re actively forgetting that an interview is a two-way street. You are there to interview the company, meet potential coworkers and managers, check out the workspace and generally see if this would work for you. Be present, focused, and try to enjoy yourself.

Hard work>Perfection

High-achievers and perfectionists are vulnerable to imposter syndrome because they’re constantly setting unrealistic expectations for themselves. It’s important to realize that nobody knows everything, and that’s okay! Seeing yourself as a hard-worker who gets things done as opposed to someone constantly chasing perfection will help you recognize your strengths and speak to them authentically.

Take your time

When candidates are nervous they tend to talk fast and immediately respond to every question. Give yourself a moment to absorb the information and ask clarifying questions, if necessary. You might even take notes or request to use the whiteboard. Hiring managers are looking for thoughtful, calm responses and prefer you take as much time as you need to answer their questions.

Post-interview evaluation

After the interview is over, give yourself an honest self-evaluation. Write down all the positive aspects that you believe contributed to your possibly getting the job. This behavioral conditioning exercise will help steer you away from focusing on the negative unnecessarily and instead how well you managed your stress.

Conclusion

Imposter syndrome is the idea that you got to where you are professionally due to some kind of error. The causality is unclear, but there are steps to take to better help you realize your accomplishments with the confidence you deserve. Interviews may seem daunting but, as the job seeker, much of what seems intimidating is controllable.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

Women: Win at Negotiating your Job Offer

Women face a unique set of challenges when negotiating job offers. Being viewed as ‘pushy’ when advocating for salary is an unfortunate bias that holds many women back from achieving wage parity in the workplace. It’s no wonder that when compared to men they’re far more likely to take that first offer; comparatively, men are 8x more likely to negotiate a higher starting salary.

A recent study out of Australia also found that when women actually do ask for raises, they are less likely to get one. (Rock, meet hard place.)

Same game, different ballpark.

Negotiation is, unfortunately, different for men and women out of necessity. It’s common knowledge that women in the US earn only 77.4% of men’s annual salary and data confirms the existence of workplace bias. Ladies, effectively sharpening your negotiation skills will help you to achieve your career goals beyond a salary. Whether you’re in the early stages of navigating the job market or you have an offer on the table you should be empowered to negotiate your next job contract.

So how do you prepare, especially if you’re not a “negotiator”? You obviously don’t want to ask for too much and risk coming across as out of touch, or get lowballed (so-to-speak).

But, first — here’s some surprising data:

According to TalentWorks data, being a job seeking woman gives you about a 50% hireability boost over men. Resumes with obviously female names had a +48.3% higher chance of getting an interview.

women hireability

We believe this is indicative of many reasons: women outperforming men in college (last fall women made up 56% of university students on campus nationwide), most recruiters are women, and how hiring and promoting more women boosts your bottom line.

Know your salary scale.

Before you’re offered the job, make sure you’re aware of the industry standard of pay (at least what is typical) for this position. Also, understand that your location, skill set, the industry, years of experience, and education/certifications all represent factors that you should leverage when nailing down the offer.

“To begin with, do your research.” says Erin Feldman, Senior TalentAdvocate with TalentWorks. “Try using a Fair Pay calculator or similar tool to be able to go into your negotiations informed. This will give you an idea of what folks in similar positions are making in your area. Then be sure to consider non-monetary compensation such as benefits, PTO, retirement, flex-scheduling, and the option to telecommute. These can have just as much value (if not more!) than salary alone.”

Frame your requests.

Every administrative assistant, programmer, and business analyst comes with a unique background. If you have skills that range beyond that of the job description, consider positioning them in way that ties back to the business. For example, if you’re a marketing manager with advanced SQL skills you can leverage the fact that not only do you have data analytics chops but database management experience that can directly contribute to advanced lead analysis. Know your strengths and differentiators.

Demonstrate your effectiveness.

Negotiation is an art, and you need to master it. Studies have shown that by using a certain negotiating strategy, specifically, saying “I’m hopeful you’ll see my skill at negotiating as something important I bring to the jobwomen improve both their social and negotiating outcomes. By knowing your worth as a candidate and presenting it in a relatable, personable manner you are not only effectively negotiating but making a good first impression as being a capable employee.

Maintain perspective, but don’t be afraid to walk away.

If you’ve done your research, asked for market rate, and are being reasonable if presented a low offer (and it’s becoming a back-and-forth), don’t be afraid to bail. Understand their constraints (i.e. salaries are determined by departmental budget), but hiring managers do in fact have wiggle room. It’s your job to figure out where they’re flexible (and where they’re not) and if that works for you.

Conclusion

Negotiating a job offer is part of the job search process. The more prepared you are to do so, the better you will fare. Remember that salary is important, but consider the whole deal such as the job’s potential for growth, flexibility with hours, and perks. Your goal is to position yourself effectively and get the job right.

Need some 1:1 practice with an actual hiring manager? For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).