Unemployment is at a record low. Where’s my job?

Dear Sarah,

Apparently, unemployment is at 3.9%…but, I’m still looking for a job. How do I reconcile this and, you know, find one?

Thanks,

Feeling Alone Right Now

Hey FARN,

Jobless rates are at a five-decade low having just recently dipped from 4% (2/10 of a percentage point lower than it’s record low in The 60s). Significant!

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US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Understandably, this is frustrating to read if you’re an active job seeker. Job hunting sucks and there are a variety of factors that are stacked against you of which you have no control.

‘What are you not doing’, you ask?

Here are a few data-backed tips that may help:

The Job Search… just go for it!

If you meet more than 60% of the job qualifications, you should apply! Many people, in particular women, will avoid applying if they’re not 100% qualified. Apply to as many jobs as you can to make up for the fact that any single job you apply for online is nearly zero.

Your Resume

Not only should you have a simple machine-parsable resume format but you should include as many keywords as possible in your resume AND cover letter from the original job posting.

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Also, describe your job achievements with different action verbs. This one resume tip is is associated with +139.6% boost in getting more interviews. Literally, all you have to do is change the first word in your resume skill set to an action word and it increases your chances of an interview over competition by +140%! Also, if you describe the different things that you did at that company with different action verbs, you’ll have finished strong.

In Person

If you’ve made it to the interview stage of your job search journey you have a solid chance of getting the job. Be your charming self and relax knowing that you’ve made it this far.

Oh, and be sure to get the earliest appointment you can in the day when interviewing. Interviewers get hangry.

All the best!

 

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How should I explain my layoff in my job interview?

Dear Sarah,

I was laid off 5 months ago due to a company merger and it has been tough finding work. I’ve finally managed to snag an interview recently, but now I’m struggling to prepare how I’m going to frame my layoff. Any advice?

Thanks,

Laid Off and Out

Hey LOO,

First of all, congrats on the job interview!

Secondly, you’re not alone having had a tough time getting an interview. At Talent.Works we’ve actually found that the job hunt is tougher for those that have experienced layoffs/firings; having either on your resume is the equivalent of losing 5 years of work experience. (It’s especially hard if you were fired, quit, or laid off in the first 15 months of being there).

The good news is, you’re past the hard part! This company has already viewed your resume, liked what they saw, and decided to start the conversation. At this point, it’s all about communication:

Be Transparent  

Understand that there is nothing to be embarrassed about when it comes to a layoff. There are a multitude of reasons that someone will get laid-off in their lifetime and it happens to everyone from star employees to 80% of an entire sales department, for example. (In other words, don’t take it personal as there are business decisions.)

Be honest and transparent about communicating your situation, for example, include the correct start and end dates to your jobs. In your case, explaining the circumstances surrounding your layoff (RE: merger) will also eliminate this as being a performance issue. Whatever the reason, keep it brief.

Explain your value add

Regardless of the amount time you spent at your job, hiring managers want to know how you contributed. Make sure you list out your accomplishments such as raising funds or saving money and tie it back to the bottom line. Even if you were there for 6 months, emphasize your skills and how you contributed to departmental goals.

Make available past work

If you haven’t already considered it, crafting a specialized blog, website, or portfolio showcasing your work is a great way to convince hiring managers you have the skills necessary for this position regardless of past circumstances. Case studies, writing/design samples, and lesson plans are all great examples of what a manager would find helpful in making their decision. Of course, don’t share anything of a proprietary nature.

Gather your references

Social proof! Colleagues willing to provide testimonials as to your work ethic and past performance is incredibly valuable, especially if it’s coming from the job where you experienced the layoff. It will offset potential concerns and they’ll be able to briefly speak to the situation, if asked. If they’re not able to provide a phone reference, send them a reference request via LinkedIN and make sure your hiring manager has access.

All the best!

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Should I have more than one resume?

Dear Sarah,

I’m currently in the job market and have been applying to dozens of different positions a day. It just occurred to me that I might be shooting myself in the foot with just the one resume as I’m not getting any responses. Could this be why I’m still unemployed?

Thanks,

Debating Multiples

Hey DM,

Not knowing your situation fully I can’t attribute this as being The Reason why you’re still looking, but I would say your intuition is correct and here’s why:

Hiring managers are adept at spotting generic resumes. Trust me. It’s actually a big reason why you may be dismissed as a candidate. From the title of your attachment (i.e.: ‘JohnDoe_Marketing’) to the cadence of your cover letter, it’s much more effective and worth your time to tailor each resume to the desired job/position.

I know, I know. It’s easier to cast a wide net with the one resume, and sometimes that works. But, if your response rate is low or your not getting the ‘right’ responses for what you desire job-wise, please consider either adding more personalization or in some cases crafting multiple resumes.

If the jobs you’re applying to have distinctly different needs, it makes sense to have completely separate resumes. For example, if you’re a financial analyst for a non-profit but are looking to cross industries into marketing it would make sense to have two separate resumes where, for instance, you can focus on how your data driven background and brand knowledge precipitated your interest in business. Removing very specific, unadaptive skills and focusing on transferable skills is key.

Unless you’re making a drastic career change, having multiple resumes isn’t really necessary. It’s for this reason that I’d start with tailoring what you have to better suit the job.

Some quick personalization tips, I’d recommend:

  • Use keywords: You’re most likely competing with hundreds of other candidates. Hiring managers (especially in larger companies) are using quick scans and applicant tracking systems to quickly narrow down an applicant pool. Using words from the job description everywhere in your resume helps to ensure you’re still a contender.
  • Focus on the employer’s needs: Really look at the job description. If the role indicates “cross-functional collaboration” and you have the experience working in such an environment be sure to weave that into your resume. Use real examples, as well.
  •  Use numbers with your keywords: Adding numbers to your transferable achievements is extremely eye-catching. Were you responsible for “managing customer service”? Instead of using something ambiguous and vague, use it as an opportunity to tout your accomplishments: “Increased survey response rate by 15% with excellent customer service”. 

All the best!

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