Dear Sarah – I’m a furloughed worker. What’s the quickest, most effective way to update my resume?

Hi Sarah,

As you probably know, US federal workers are currently working without pay. Unfortunately, being a federal worker myself, my family can’t sustain this for much longer (especially because I’m contract). I need another job right now. What’s the quickest way to update my resume?

Thank you,

Pay me Now

Hi PmN,

The current situation regarding federal employees is terrible and “moonlighting” to supplement your income isn’t a solution, as has been suggested. So, let’s get to it. Here’s the quick and dirty for improving/updating your resume in 20 minutes:

Add Numbers

Using concrete numbers provides you with a hireabilty increase of 40.2%! We recommend for every 3 sentences, use at least 1 number to demonstrate your (concrete) impact. 

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Put yourself in the shoes of a hiring manager. Who would you rather hire:

Helped increase sales by 31% by working with Operations Manager to reduce time to 1st customer reply.

Collaborated with Operations Manager improve customer reply times.

Cut the Fat

Every word on your resume should have purpose. Clean-up your resume and retain precious resume real estate by taking out the following:

  • Objectives 
  • “Resume/CV” at the top of the page or “References provided upon request” at the bottom
  • Your photograph
  • Any usage of “I” or “My”. (Write in the 3rd person.)
  • Generic list of skills
  • Irrelevant job experience(s)
  • “Weird” interests/hobbies

Know when to apply

Apply on Mondays (don’t apply on Fridays or Saturdays).

Apply before 10am.

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Meeting ~50% of job “requirements” is good enough. Don’t hesitate!

Additionally, apply to 150-250 jobs. Despite the low unemployment rate, the job market is extremely competitive. Everyone, regardless of credentials and work history, can expect to send out hundreds of resumes…so, start auditing your resume right now.

As an added bonus, we’d like to offer all furloughed federal workers a free membership and would encourage you to connect with us ASAP. Please send an email to hello@talent.works and our team will help you find a job 5.8x faster.

Best,

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Dear Sarah – How do I “network” if I don’t have a network?

Hi Sarah,

I just graduated from college where I was primarily a commuter, non-trad student. I believe because of this, my professional network is pretty small. How do I go about expanding my network and gain valuable connections?

Thanks,

Out at Sea

Hi OaS,

Consider what a ‘network’ means. Did you partake in any college activities, intramural sports, or clubs? Did you volunteer or hold an internship? Your network is everyone in your life (including friends and family) that you’ve connected or worked with that can speak to your character, work ethic and abilities. Everyone has a network. Intentionally expanding your network is another story.

Making connections in a “networking” setting (i.e.: a ‘Meetup’ or industry conference) is all about mutual generosity. Simply put, what do you have that another person would enjoy learning about or utilizing?

Networking Tip #1: Context

Be visible!

Whether you insert yourself intentionally such as asking second degree connections for someone’s info or making yourself available to various communities you’re fighting 2/3 of the battle. LinkedIN is a great way to message people for introductions and request a coffee date from someone whose profile you admire. The best part about LinkedIN is that everyone expects to be professionally messaged, be it recruiters or 3rd degree connections within your industry. Don’t shy away from putting yourself out there in various ways.

Also, use your alumni association! You didn’t just pay big money for 4 years; alumni associations are forever.

Networking Tip #2: Follow-up

You’d be amazed at how many people make the effort to attend events and simply don’t follow-up with their contacts post-interaction. Shoot them a quick email/message on LinkedIN after 24 hours –

Hi there [new contact’s name],

It was great to meet you at [event name] on [date]. I had a great time talking with you about [topic discussed]. Regarding your LinkedIn profile, it says you’re currently working on [current job/organization/side project]—and [relay how it relates to you]. Are you free to grab coffee?

Best,

[You]

It’s honestly that simple. Keep track of who you met and where, make a networking goal for yourself every month (it’s ok to start with 1!), and be genuine and helpful.

Best,

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Dear Sarah – Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Hi Sarah,

I asked my boss for a raise but he said I didn’t deserve it so I sent him my resignation letter. Now he is asking me to stay with a higher salary.

Should I accept his offer or start my job search?

Best,

Lost and Confused

Hi LaC,

70-80% of people who accept counteroffers either leave or are let go within a year.

Why? Counteroffers are retention tools. It takes a great deal of time, energy and money to rehire, something that employers typically prefer to avoid all together. While accepting a counteroffer may seem workable in the short-term, you have already established yourself as untrustworthy. It’s difficult to overcome being viewed in this light and may affect the types of projects you’re given or future pay hikes.

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Start looking for a new job. In the future, should you need a raise, here is my advice: appeal to your employer’s priorities without being threatening (i.e.: presenting them with ultimatums or resignations).

There’s a lot to be said for the spirit of cooperation-

“I’ve been receiving a bunch of competing offers as of late. I’m not interested and I’m definitely not thinking about leaving, as I love my team and appreciate the direction this company is going. I understand the company can’t match these offers, but I was wondering if we can close the gap a bit. If not, of course I understand.”

The above example speaks to an understanding and awareness that any employer would appreciate. You’re not requesting a match, but a bump. Asking for a raise isn’t an art form; it can be as easy and straightforward as understanding your manager’s priorities and goals.

Pro-tip: If/When you’re actively interviewing for a new position and you’re inevitably asked “So why are you choosing to leave your current job”, it’s important to remember you are interviewing the company, as well. Let the company sell themselves a bit: “I’m very happy with my current job. I learned from [recruiter name/referral] of the interesting work you’re doing and I’m always open to new opportunities.”

Good luck!

(P.S. Connect with one of our talented mentors [former hiring managers] for interview practice and more advice regarding how to navigate the counteroffer!)

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3 Tips to ‘Storify’ Your Resume

Beyond tips and tricks, ‘dos’ and ‘don’ts’, the ultimate purpose of a resume is to tell a story. Your story. Hiring managers rely on resumes to make the case that the candidate being represented is the best person for the job. So, how do you tell a compelling story using a standard resume?

Looks Matter

Resume real estate is extremely valuable, in that you only have 1 page to make an impression. There’s much debate around acceptable resume length, but at the end of the day less in more when time is against you. Achieving the right balance with an effective usage of white space is the cornerstone of any resume, as are bullet points and a consistent use of italics, boldface type and capitalization.

Hiring managers will not spend time looking for the key facts that make you the perfect candidate, so your formatting must do that for them.

Pro-tip: Your font size should never be less than 10pt or more than 12pt. We recommend the following fonts- Tahoma, Arial, Century Gothic, Bookman, Garamond, Verdana, Cambria, and Times New Roman.

Include Unique Sections

All resumes should have the following 4 sections, regardless:

  • Contact Info
  • Experience Section
  • Education Section
  • Key Skills Section

but, beyond the standard there are many ways to further your story with unique sections. For instance, hobbies, volunteer work, training/certifications, honors, associations, languages, and projects are all great selling points for being a good cultural fit and generally a well-rounded professional.

Pro-tip: People who used even one personal pronoun in their employment section (not the objective or professional summary section) had a -54.7% lower chance of getting an interview callback.

Consider Relevancy

No one likes a long and boring story; too much information is difficult to navigate. Forcing every job you’ve had onto one page isn’t necessary nor advisable. Instead of describing your day-to-day job responsibilities focus on what you did. Obviously, the hiring manager knows what the job itself entails so by focusing on your personal accomplishments you’re crafting a narrative that grabs the reader’s attention.

Consider why you’re listing various items and how that will ultimately improve your candidacy. 

Pro-tip: Past work experience should be written in the past tense.

Conclusion

The climax of your “story” is your goal: to get the job. ‘Storifying’ your resume helps create an image beyond bullet points and highlights your professional accomplishments in a unique, memorable way.

For $10/month we can automatically find the best jobs and pre-fill job applications for you based on your desired role, location and years of experience. In addition, you’ll get our Interview Guarantee — if we can’t get you an interview within 60 days, we’ll refund everything back to you, guaranteed. (90% of job-seekers using TalentWorks get an interview in 60 days or less).

 

Dear Sarah – Was my resume trashed?

Hi Sarah,

What do hiring managers absolutely hate seeing on resumes/CVs? What would get you automatically disqualified?

Best,

DQ

Hi DQ,

There are many things that might disqualify you as a candidate. Recruiters and hiring managers default to saying ‘no’ due to their own time constraints; identifying ‘red flags’ becomes second nature when there’s an overwhelming candidate pool. I’ll touch on a few:

First, avoid dumb mistakes. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation challenged resumes are the worst offender. Why? It’s avoidable with basic proofreading (and do so more than once). Don’t expect your spellcheck to catch everything, like, ‘higher’ instead of ‘hire. (Yep, we’ve seen it.)

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Earlier this year, we were actively hiring to fill a position on the TalentWorks team. Of the 426 applicants for our last job, 25% (108 applicants) was basically spam, e.g. outsourcers, recruiters. Almost 10% (40 applicants) made dumb mistakes, e.g. misspellings, forgot to include their email!

Second, a resume without a clear indication of professional progression is another potential ‘red flag’. Hiring managers look for promotions within the same company,  title changes and a logical career flow. If your resume indicates a career plateau (or a career gone backwards, so-to-speak) make sure you add color to your cover letter. (Don’t forget the cover letter!)

Thirdly, if you’re a mid-level employee applying for a ‘lower position’ make sure your resume doesn’t indicate over-qualification, another potential ‘red flag’. Only indicate relevant work history and degrees. Focus on the exact skills and responsibilities highlighted in the job description, which will help distract from titles. 

Lastly, another (very) avoidable mistake that will immediately disqualify you from candidacy is a failure to follow directions. If the job posting asks you to include/attach certain documents, list a salary requirement or fill out their online resume form (I know, I know, it’s tedious)…just do it because there are plenty of people who won’t hesitate.

Good luck!

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